Close Menu X
Navigate

Blog

September 10, 2017 - David's Discipline and Restoration

Prepare for Sunday morning worship using the guide below.

Adult Education

We will continue a series based on God's Big Picture: Tracing the Story Line of the Bible, this Sunday in the youth room. This study will focus on the coherency of the Bible, following the specific theme kingdom of God and showing Christ as unifying subject and focus of the Bible. Ray Rutledge and Bo Pritchard will be in the Adult 1 classroom continuing through The Gospel Project (currently going through the New Testament).

2 Samuel 12:15b-25, 15:13-23, 19:11-15

2 Samuel 12: 15b-25

15bAnd the Lord afflicted the child that Uriah's wife bore to David, and he became sick. 16 David therefore sought God on behalf of the child. And David fasted and went in and lay all night on the ground. 17 And the elders of his house stood beside him, to raise him from the ground, but he would not, nor did he eat food with them. 18 On the seventh day the child died. And the servants of David were afraid to tell him that the child was dead, for they said, “Behold, while the child was yet alive, we spoke to him, and he did not listen to us. How then can we say to him the child is dead? He may do himself some harm.” 19 But when David saw that his servants were whispering together, David understood that the child was dead. And David said to his servants, “Is the child dead?” They said, “He is dead.” 20 Then David arose from the earth and washed and anointed himself and changed his clothes. And he went into the house of the Lord and worshiped. He then went to his own house. And when he asked, they set food before him, and he ate. 21 Then his servants said to him, “What is this thing that you have done? You fasted and wept for the child while he was alive; but when the child died, you arose and ate food.” 22 He said, “While the child was still alive, I fasted and wept, for I said, ‘Who knows whether the Lord will be gracious to me, that the child may live?’ 23 But now he is dead. Why should I fast? Can I bring him back again? I shall go to him, but he will not return to me.”

2 Samuel 15:13-23

13 And a messenger came to David, saying, “The hearts of the men of Israel have gone after Absalom.” 14 Then David said to all his servants who were with him at Jerusalem, “Arise, and let us flee, or else there will be no escape for us from Absalom. Go quickly, lest he overtake us quickly and bring down ruin on us and strike the city with the edge of the sword.” 15 And the king's servants said to the king, “Behold, your servants are ready to do whatever my lord the king decides.”16 So the king went out, and all his household after him. And the king left ten concubines to keep the house. 17 And the king went out, and all the people after him. And they halted at the last house.

18 And all his servants passed by him, and all the Cherethites, and all the Pelethites, and all the six hundred Gittites who had followed him from Gath, passed on before the king. 19 Then the king said to Ittai the Gittite, “Why do you also go with us? Go back and stay with the king, for you are a foreigner and also an exile from your home. 20 You came only yesterday, and shall I today make you wander about with us, since I go I know not where? Go back and take your brothers with you, and may the Lord show steadfast love and faithfulness to you.” 21 But Ittai answered the king, “As the Lord lives, and as my lord the king lives, wherever my lord the king shall be, whether for death or for life, there also will your servant be.” 22 And David said to Ittai, “Go then, pass on.” So Ittai the Gittite passed on with all his men and all the little ones who were with him. 23 And all the land wept aloud as all the people passed by, and the king crossed the brook Kidron, and all the people passed on toward the wilderness. 

2 Samuel 19:11-15

11 And King David sent this message to Zadok and Abiathar the priests: “Say to the elders of Judah, ‘Why should you be the last to bring the king back to his house, when the word of all Israel has come to the king? 12 You are my brothers; you are my bone and my flesh. Why then should you be the last to bring back the king?’ 13 And say to Amasa, ‘Are you not my bone and my flesh? God do so to me and more also, if you are not commander of my army from now on in place of Joab.’” 14 And he swayed the heart of all the men of Judah as one man, so that they sent word to the king, “Return, both you and all your servants.” 15 So the king came back to the Jordan, and Judah came to Gilgal to meet the king and to bring the king over the Jordan.

Sermon Summary

In Samuel 12b-20, David reaps the consequences of his sin: his child dies, Absalom kills Amnon, Absalom drives David out of Jerusalem, and Absalom is killed. After Absalom’s death, the exiled king returns to Jerusalem. The pattern we see in these chapters is one we find throughout Scripture: Sin, exile, restoration. Keeping in mind Solomon’s birth in chapter 12, a section riddled with death/curses, we see that there is the hope of a son of David (2 Sam 7), who comes from the seed of the woman (Gen 3:15), who would one day deliver his people from exile, reopening the way for the King to again dwell with his people. 

Some common canonical themes we find are sin, curses, exile, restoration.

One common phrase that the author weaves several times, which fits the exile-restoration theme, is “crossing the Jordan.” The was seen in the life of Israel when they crossed the Jordan and went into the land. In David, we see almost an undoing of the Exodus, as he “crosses the Jordon” when leaving Jerusalem and later “crosses the Jordan” again before reentering the city.

Review and Apply

Are you experiencing suffering in your life?

If so, could God be disciplining you for sin in your life, as he disciplined David?

Can you identify these sins in your life? The hope is that bringing these sins to light would lead to your repentance and restoration.